Gov. Newsom Signed Off on Bills to Fight Systemic Racism, Police Brutality

Newsom signed to ban the carotid restraint and combat racial injustice

Photo+by+Gage+Skidmore+on+flickr.com

Photo by Gage Skidmore on flickr.com

On Wednesday afternoon Gov. Newsom signed off on AB 3121, a law whose goal is to “combat racism and discrimination in the legal system.” According to Newsom, California has a, “painful history of slavery,” which he believes has only gotten worse. Newsom pressed forward to aid, “California’s rich diversity,” which he said is made of Black Californians and other people of color.

Newsom also signed off on bills which require California to reform the police as well as criminal and juvenile justice. One such bill bans police from using the carotid restraint which Newsom said, “blocks the flow of blood to the brain.” Newsom believes that there have been too many cases of police brutality in California alone. He said that many Americans have demanded justice and said, “we heard those calls for action loud and clear today.”

Pomona resident, Alexa Vargas, 31, is a single mother whose daughter is 7-years-old and currently in the second grade. Vargas was pleased to hear about the law. “I’m actually really excited to hear about all these laws being passed,” Vargas said. “As a single mother of a black girl, I’m not always going to be alive and it worries me to know that there are so many laws that hinder my child rather than back her up.”

Moreno Valley resident, Alexis Fisher, 29, said, “I love that [Newsom] continues to lead the nation with our state.”

“This is so great for the future generations of ethnic backgrounds to know they were acknowledged,” Fisher said. “We will have to see if this can actually be applied. California never had to say how openly free and diverse we were but this definitely solidified it.” Fisher, is of black and latinx descent.

Newsom’s signing has pressed California to reform its justice system, including monitoring how police force is used. However, Newsom believes that, “there is still so much work to do to unravel this legacy.”